Review: “Café Society” (2016)

31 07 2016

Ryan vs. Cinema

Picture: Amazon Studios

Every year I check in with my favourite New York neurotic to see what underrated treat he’s been occupying his time on. One cannot deny the fact that we are in the era of “Mild Woody”, but even his lesser endeavors are generally triumphant. The most vocal criticism towards Café Society, his latest ode to 1930s Hollywood, is that it’s more of the same. That is, for the most part, true. Over the fifty years he’s occupied our screens as a filmmaker, Allen has crafted a thoroughly clear image of himself as an artist. Those opposed to him, his image, and his style will surely reject Café Society as another one of his “mediocre outings”. But I’ve seen all forty-seven of his features, read his four books, and listened to every recording of his stand-up I could get my hands on. When it comes to Woody…

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Movie Review: Café Society (2016) Directed by Woody Allen

25 07 2016

The famous CASABLANCA story is retold, Allen style

Source: Movie Review: Café Society (2016) Directed by Woody Allen





White City Cinema’s Michael Smith shows his appreciation for “Cafe Society” star Kristen Stewart

23 07 2016

Like many latter-day Woody Allen films, Café Society is a mixed bag. Genuine hilarity coexists with jokes that fall flat, scripted dialogue alternates between the reasonably naturalistic and the to…

Source: White City Cinema’s Michael Smith shows his appreciation for “Cafe Society” star Kristen Stewart





White City Cinema’s Michael Smith shows his appreciation for “Cafe Society” star Kristen Stewart

23 07 2016

Chicago Independent Film Critics Circle

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Like many latter-day Woody Allen films, Café Society is a mixed bag. Genuine hilarity coexists with jokes that fall flat, scripted dialogue alternates between the reasonably naturalistic and the tone deaf, and acting is all over the map. The film’s saving grace is a lead performance by Kristen Stewart, so winning in its “casual complexity and low-key intensity” (to borrow the subtitle of a recent Stewart profile in Film Comment by Northwestern professor Nick Davis) that it single-handedly elevates Café Society to the status of essential viewing for the summer movie-going season.

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